Startup Website Reviews – Episode 3: SimplyBill.com

Reviewing SimplyBill.com



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5 comments ↓

#1 Craig on 04.01.10 at 8:19 am

Hi Rob,

Many thanks for the review. Definately some great tips in there for SEO, and glad to know I’m not too far off the mark.

I take the point about the Free Plan – conversion rate is ok so I think it’ll stay for now, but you’re right – I don’t have VC funding to carry large numbers of free users without having enough on the paid plans.

I like the point about phone number/address – it should build more trust which I hadn’t noticed was that lacking.

Great stuff though – really appreciate your comments Keep an eye on the site, as I’ll be implementing a few of those tips in the coming weeks.

Thanks!

#2 Justin Bailey on 04.01.10 at 12:02 pm

This is the third review I’ve watched and I am really impressed. Thanks for doing these – they are very interesting!

#3 Stephan Wehner on 04.01.10 at 3:03 pm

Yes your reviews are nice!

So you’re saying don’t do freemium. How about one-month-free-trials?

Stephan

#4 Rob on 04.01.10 at 5:42 pm

I would say I heartly discourage freemium. I think it can work in some cases…but they are very limited circumstances.

Free trials are great, whether they are -day, 14-day or 1-month. Providing a cut-off date is key since it forces someone to make a decision.

Also, you can’t just have a free trial and call it good; you need to have a few emails go out to the prospect to educate them, ask if they have any questions, and check on how their progress is going using your service. Without this they will forget about you and their free trial will expire without a whisper.

#5 Johannes on 04.03.10 at 6:32 am

These reviews are very educational and well done. Thank you.

Two comments about trials. Make sure that even if the user buys your software or service, you start billing only after the trial period. An obvious thing, but I think it’s good to mention. Second comment I have is that do send emails for users that have gone through the trial period, but have not made the step, but please limit the amount of emails, have an expiration date of the record you keep and provide an easy way to unsubscribe from the email and provide an easy quick feedback form in the unsubscribe page.